Meet the group!

Principal Investigator

Howard Stone
Howard A. Stone
Office: D328 E-Quad
Email: hastone[at]princeton.edu
Phone: 609-258-9493
Web
Fluid motions dominated by viscosity, so-called low-Reynolds-number flows, have many applications, including the lubricating motions important to the operation of mechanical equipment (and joints), coating flows important to a myriad of industrial applications, and flows and transport processes in microdevices (MEMS) that are finding many new applications owing to their use for handling small quantities of (possibly expensive) liquids and for manipulating polymers. The flow of many suspensions are also often dominated by viscous effects as are the way in which fluid moves in foams and dense colloidal suspensions. Professor Stone and his research group actively work on projects in each of these areas of fluid dynamics. Several of the projects combine theory and experiment in order to more fully explore the limits of both.

Another common theme of viscous flow theory being pursued by Professor Stone and his collaborators is the dynamics of fluid-fluid interfaces. This research includes analytical and numerical studies (often using integral equation methods) of (1) the stretching and breakup of fluid threads and (2) the effect of electric fields on drops and other fluid-fluid interfaces. Because a complete understanding of some viscously dominated flows (such as lift forces) may require incorporating the influence of inertia, Professor Stone also uses asymptotic methods to study flows at small, but finite, Reynolds numbers.

Many biologically inspired problems occur in the viscously dominated flow limit. Professor Stone has studied several problems concerning the flow of lipid monolayers and bilayers, and has investigated the motions of particles suspended in such interfacial layers. This research area is actively pursued by researchers at the interface of chemistry, physics and engineering.


Current Members

Janine Nunes
Janine Nunes
(Post-doc)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: nunes[at]princeton.edu
I am interested in the controlled synthesis and fabrication of novel micro-objects, such as microfibers and core-shell/hollow microspheres, using multiphase microfluidics to template the precursor liquid phases.


Naomi Oppenheimer
Naomi Oppenheimer
(Post-doc)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: naomiop[at]gmail.com
Web
Currently I am working on two problems: 1. Finding the Smoluchowski analog for chemical reactions taking place in membranes (including hydrodynamic interactions). 2. Rotation and translation coupling for a particle in an environment of varying viscosity. I'm assuming there will be other cool problems in the future.


Jing Yan
Jing Yan
(Post-doc, co-advised by Bonnie Bassler and Ned Wingreen)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: jingyan[at]princeton.edu
No bacterium is an island. In their natural environment, bacteria survive in a structured community called biofilm. By secreting polysaccharides and proteins, bacteria stick themselves together to fight against predators and antibiotics. In order to combat bacterial infections we need to understand how bacteria form such biofilms, yet our knowledge about the formation process of biofilm is limited. Combining state-of-art optics, microfluidic techniques, and genetic tools, I am starting to unveil the underlying principle of biofilms, using the notorious pathogen Vibrio cholerae as a model organism.


Maksim Mezhericher
Maksim Mezhericher
(Research-Staff)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: maksymm[at]princeton.edu
Web
My main research interests include: formation of submicron and nanodroplets, formation of nanoemulsions, production of nanoparticles, nanostructures, and coatings, transport phenomena and fluid mechanics of multiphase flows, heat and mass transfer, drying processes, and thermal, renewable, and nuclear energy.


Suin Shim
Suin Shim
(Post-doc)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: sshim[at]princeton.edu
I’m interested in various interfacial flow problems and their applications. My research includes microfluidic studies on the effect of surfactants on CO2 bubble dissolution, migration of particles driven by CO2 dissolution, coalescence of liquid drops with Marangoni flow, and controlled evaporative cooling using a thin film flow of water.


Ying Liu
Ying Liu
(Graduate Student)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: yl6[at]princeton.edu
Web
I am interested in a broad range of problems related to fluid interfaces. I am currently studying the failure of slippery liquid infused porous surfaces. Also, I am investigating the motion of a bubble in a capillary tube driven by a gradient of surfactant concentration.


Fan Yang
Fan Yang
(Graduate Student)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: fy2[at]princeton.edu
I am interested in modeling various flow and electrokinetics problems under the low-Reynolds-number limit, including the rectification effects in an asymmetric nanopore and the diffusiophoresis of soft particles. Currently, I am studying the instabilities in magnetohydrodynamics.


Akanksha Thawani
Akanksha Thawani
(Graduate Student)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: athawani[at]princeton.edu
My research interests involve problems in biophysics, applied mathematics and quantitative biology. I aim to understand the biophysics of the mitotic spindle, a molecular machinery made of microtubules - dynamic biopolymers - built to divide chromosomes faithfully into two daughter cells. Currently, I am studying one of the microtubule nucleation pathway for spindle formation, along with the size and force scaling characteristics in the mitotic spindle.


Estella Yu
Estella Yu
(Graduate Student)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: yingxian[at]princeton.edu
Web
Estella Yu is currently an MAE gradutate student. Estella received her B.S in Mechanical Engineering from Boston University in 2015. Prior to Princeton, her research focused on microdroplets and drop interfaces. Generally, Estella has a wide range of interests in Fluid Mechanics, including topics related to biology, materials, etc.


Lailai Zhu
Lailai Zhu
(Post-doc)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: lzhu[at]princeton.edu Web
I am interested in problems related to low-Reynolds-number fluid-structure interactions, bio-inspired design of active and adaptive systems, sea-ice dynamics, non-Newtonian/multiphase flows and microfluidics, etc. I build and utilize a variety of high-fidelity computational tools, and develop theoretical models to tackle these problems. Combing simulations and theory, my research not only aims to unravel the physical mechanisms underlying the natural phenomena and experimental observations, but also to explore and develop innovative strategies that would inform new, advanced engineering designs.


Pawel J. Zuk
Pawel J. Zuk
(Post-doc)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: pzuk[at]princeton.edu
I am interested in fluid mechanics, stochastic processes, biology where it meets them and methods both theoretical and numerical to solve problems originating from those fields. From the smallest length scale to the largest: I have worked with hydrodynamic interaction models, dynamics and viscosity of biomolecules, spatial aspects of biological regulatory networks and OpenFOAM library for biomass gasification. Currently I study the suspensions of soft particles and dynamics of thin films.


Ankur Gupta
Ankur Gupta
(Post-doc)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: ankur[at]princeton.edu
Web
I am interested in the broad area of interfaces, multiphase flow, colloids, and electrochemistry. I use a combination of theoretical, computational, and experimental techniques to tackle these problems. During my PhD, I worked on formation of nanoemulsions and interfacial micro-scale flow around obstacles. Currently, I am applying concepts of colloids and rheology in electrochemical systems for energy applications.


Min Pack
Min Pack
(Post-doc)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: mpack[at]princeton.edu
Web
My research is mainly driven by fluid mechanics with a particular interest in applications for the developing world context. I am broadly interested in the following research topics: interfacial phenomena, thin film dynamics, hydrodynamic instabilities and colloidal assembly.


Nan Xue
Nan Xue
(Graduate Student)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: nxue[at]princeton.edu
I am interested in surface tension effects, droplets, instabilities and convection and buoyancy driven flows. At present I am working on pattern formation in double-diffusive convection and mixing in negative buoyancy fountain.


Guang Chen
Guang Chen
(Post-doc)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: guangc[at]princeton.edu
My research interests embrace fluid dynamics and soft matter physics. Specifically, the subjects I have been studying involve the theoretical studies and simulations of polyelectrolyte thermodynamics, electrokinetics in soft systems, thermoelectrics, additive manufacturing and energy harvesting. Currently I am working on the rheology of viscoelastic fluid and the dynamics among bacterial capsules in biofilms.


Bernardo Gouveia
Bernardo Gouveia
(Graduate Student)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: bgouveia[at]princeton.edu Web
I am broadly interested in applying theoretical ideas from continuum transport and statistical mechanics towards understanding the behavior of complex fluids. Currently, I am working out a theory for the dynamics of microtubule suspensions in the prometaphase spindle. I am also thinking about flows of viscoelastic fluids in curvilinear geometries.


Jessica Wilson
Jessica Wilson
(Graduate Student)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: jlwthree[at]princeton.edu
I am interested in phoretic effects. I use soft-lithography techniques to make microfluidic devices with which I study the spontaneous movement of colloidal particles in chemical gradients. The spontaneous movement of a colloidal particle in a gradient of a solute is called diffusiophoresis.


Moran Wang
Moran Wang
(Visiting Professor)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: moranwang[at]princeton.edu
moralwang[at]gmail.com
Web
My research interests include: micro and nanoscale complex fluid mechanics, interfacial transport in microporous media, multiphysio-chemical transport, fluid-solid interactions in porous media, multiscale analysis and modeling, with applications in unconventional resources recovery, new energy systems, geological and environmental systems and so on.


Amir Pahlavan
Amir Pahlavan
(Post-doc)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: pahlavan[at]princeton.edu
Web
I have a range of interests in soft matter physics and interfacial fluid dynamics with applications in energy, environment, water resources and advanced materials. I combine experiments, theoretical modeling, and numerical simulations to advance our fundamental understanding and predictive capabilities of these phenomena across the scales.


Ya Gai
Ya Gai
(Post-doc)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: ygai[at]princeton.edu
My research interests are at the intersection of fluid mechanics, soft matter, and interfacial dynamics, with a particular focus on droplet microfluidics and emulsion flows. My current research revolves around using droplet microfluidics to study mitotic spindle formation.


Judy Yang
Judy (Qingjun) Yang
(Post-doc)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: qingjuny[at]princeton.edu
Web
I am an environmental scientist, seeking to understand our complex nature environment through simplified laboratory experiments and theoretical analysis. Currently, I am designing experiments to understand how clay minerals in soils affect the decomposition of soil organic matter and the production of green house gases.


Antonio Perazzo
Antonio Perazzo
(Post-doc)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: aperazzo[at]princeton.edu
Research Keywords: Soft Matter, Colloids, Interfaces, Rheology.


Danielle Chase
Danielle Chase
(Graduate Student)
Office: G02 E-Quad
Email: dchase[at]princeton.edu
I am broadly interested in problems in fluid mechanics related to the coupling of fluid flow and elasticity, interfacial flows, and instabilities, specifically with applications to energy and environmental and geological systems. Currently, I am investigating the dynamics of fluid-driven fracture in a porous medium.


Past Members

  • Sara Chuang
  • Samuel Smiddy
  • Jie Feng (MechSE, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, jiefeng[at]illinois.edu, Web)
  • Bhargav Rallabandi (University of California, Riverside, bhargav[at]engr.ucr.edu , Web)
  • Ching-Yao Lai
  • Sandra Sowah
  • Nazish Shahid
  • Sepideh Khodaparast (Imperial College London, s.khodaparast[at]imperial.ac.uk)
  • Jan Guzowski
  • Naima Hammoud
  • Abby Grosskopf
  • Jesse Ault (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, aultjt[at]ornl.gov, Web)
  • Hyoungsoo Kim (KAIST, Web)
  • Sangwoo Shin (University of Hawaii at Manoa, sangwoos[at]hawaii.edu, Web)
  • Zhong Zheng (University of Cambridge, Web)
  • Orest Shardt
  • MinYoung Kevin Kim
  • Rachel Bergman
  • Andrew Sharo
  • Benedikt Sabass (Forschungszentrum Jülic, Web)
  • Shahriar Afkhami (New Jersey Institute of Technology, Web)
  • François Boulogne (research[at]sciunto.org, Web)
  • Jessica Shang
  • Yong Lin Kong (yonglinkong[at]alumni.princeton.edu, Web)
  • Josephine Lembong
  • Shashi Thutupalli (National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore, India, Web)
  • Eujin Um (IBS Center for Soft and Living Matter)
  • Francois Ingremeau
  • Hassan Masoud (Michigan Tech. hmasoud[at]mtu.edu, Web)
  • Jason Wexler (Otherlab), Web)
  • Alban Sauret (CNRS, alban.sauret[at]gmail.com)
  • Ian Jacobi (Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Web)
  • On Shun Pak (Santa Clara University, opak[at]scu.edu, Web)
  • Knut Drescher (Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, k.drescher[at]mpi-marburg.mpg.de, Web)
  • Talal Al-Housseiny
  • Margarita Staykova (Durham University, margarita.staykova[at]durham.ac.uk, Web)
  • Guy Ramon (Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, ramong[at]technion.ac.il)
  • Ivan Christov (Los Alamos National Laboratory, christov[at]alum.mit.edu, Web)
  • Yi Shen (ETH Zurich)
  • Bo Sun (Oregon State University, sunb[at]physics.oregonstate.edu, Web)
  • Roseanna Zia (Cornell University, zia[at]cbe.cornell.edu, Web)
  • Matthieu Roche (CNRS-Universite Paris Sud)
  • Daniele Vigolo (ETH Zurich, daniele.vigolo[at}chem.ethz.ch, Web)
  • Camille Duprat
  • Philippe Trinh (University of Oxford, Philippe.Trinh[at}maths.ox.ac.uk, Web)
  • Manouk Abkarian (Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Manouk.Abkarian[at]um2.fr, Web)
  • Shelley Anna (Carnegie Mellon University, sanna[at]andrew.cmu.edu, Web)
  • Jeff Aristoff
  • Jacqueline Ashmore
  • Anand Bala Subramaniam (University of California Merced, asubramaniam[at]ucmerced.edu, Web)
  • Martin Bazant (MIT, bazant[at]mit.edu, Web)
  • Raymond Bergmann
  • Alex Bick (Harvard University Medical School)
  • James Bird (Boston University, jbird[at]bu.edu, Web)
  • John Bush (MIT, bush[at]math.mit.edu, Web)
  • Laurent Courbin (Université Rennes 1, laurent.courbin[at]univ-rennes1.fr)
  • Richard Day (Cambridge Consultants, richard.day[at]cambridgeconsultants.com)
  • Atray Dixit (Princeton University, adixit[at]princeton.edu)
  • Emilie Dressaire (NYU-Poly, dressaire[at]nyu.edu, Web)
  • Marc Durand
  • Magalie Faivre
  • Alison Forsyth (aforsyth[at]princeton.edu)
  • Samuel Gaudet
  • Cyprien Gay
  • Matthew Girardi (Princeton University, mgirardi[at]princeton.edu)
  • Laura Guglielmini (Stanford University, lauragug[at]stanford.edu)
  • Sascha Hilgenfeldt (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, sascha[at]illinois.edu, Web)
  • Douglas Holmes (Virginia Tech, dpholmes[at]vt.edu, Web)
  • Pilnam Kim (Korea Institute of Science and Technology)
  • Stephan Koehler (Worcester Polytechnic Institute, sak[at]wpi.edu)
  • Rebecca Kramer (Harvard University, rkramer[at]seas.harvard.edu)
  • Ann Lai (Investment Technology Group)
  • Ryan Larsen (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, larsen[at]uiuc.edu)
  • Sigolene Lecuyer (Universite Joseph Fourier at Grenoble (France), Sigolene.Lecuyer[at]ujf-grenoble.fr)
  • Jinkee Lee (Brown University, Jinkee_Lee[at]brown.edu, Web)
  • Eric Lauga (University of Cambridge, e.lauga[at]damtp.cam.ac.uk, Web)
  • Stephen Lucas
  • Michael Manga
  • Rachel Pepper (University of California Berkeley, rachel.pepper[at]berkeley.edu, Web)
  • Thomas Powers
  • Mathilde Reyssat (ESPCI Paris, mathilde.reyssat[at]espci.fr, Web)
  • William D. Ristenpart (UC Davis, wdristenpart[at]ucdavis.edu, Web)
  • Laurence Rongy (Yale University, lrongy[at]ulb.ac.be)
  • Marcus Roper (Harvard University, mroper[at]seas.harvard.edu)
  • Roberto Rusconi (MIT, rrusconi[at]mit.edu)
  • Benoit Scheid (Université Libre de Bruxelles, bscheid[at]ulb.ac.be, Web)
  • Kiril Selverov
  • Amy Shen (University of Washington, amyshen[at]u.washington.edu, Web)
  • Todd Squires (UC Santa Barbara, squires[at]engineering.ucsb.edu)
  • John Tanzosh
  • Peichun Amy Tsai (University of Alberta), peichun.amy.tsai[at]ualberta.ca, Web)
  • Scott Tsai (Ryerson University, scott.tsai[at]ryerson.ca, Web)
  • Andre Valente (Universidade de Coimbra, andre.valente[at]biocant.pt)
  • Ernst van Nierop
  • Thomas Ward (UCLA, tward[at]math.ucla. edu)
  • Michael Weidman
  • Dengfu Zhang
  • Jiandi Wan (Rochester Institute of Technology, jdween[at]rit.edu, Web)
  • Wendy Zhang (University of Chicago, Web)

Past Visitors

  • So Nagashima (Osaka University, so.nagashima[at]ams.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp)
  • Remy Mensire (remy.mensire[at]polytechnique.org)
  • Katarzyna Somszor (NYU)
  • Eline Both (Wageningen University, eline.both[at]gmail.com)
  • Nicolas Autrusson
  • Helene Berthet (École Polytechnique)
  • Henrik Bruus (Technical University of Denmark, Henrik.Bruus[at]nanotech.dtu.dk)
  • Andreas Carlson (Harvard University, carlson[at]seas.harvard.edu)
  • Jolet De Ruiter (Wageningen Universiteit, jolet.deruiter[at]wur.nl)
  • Riëlle De Ruiter (Wageningen Universiteit, rielle.deruiter[at]wur.nl)
  • Guillaume Froehlicher (École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, guillaume.froehlicher[at]ens-cachan.fr)
  • Ian Griffiths (Oxford University, griffit4[at]maths.ox.ac.uk)
  • Martin Heller
  • Atefeh Khoshnood (Sharif University of Technology, atefeh.khoshnood[at]gmail.com)
  • Maxime Lanoy (ESPCI Paris)
  • Jiang Li (University of Science and Technology Beijing, jiangli[at]princeton.edu)
  • Xintong Li (The College of New Jersey)
  • Zhenzhen Li (ESPCI, zhenzhen[at]princeton.edu)
  • Kristian Smistrup
  • Stephen Wilson (University of Strathclyde, s.k.wilson[at]strath.ac.uk, Web)